CALL US: 651-631-0616

Comparing inter vivos and testamentary trusts

Creating and adhering to an estate plan is no simple task. Generally, the end goal of estate planning is to divide up and transfer assets to loved ones at minimal or zero tax cost. Of course, a will is a good starting point, but it may be supplemented by various…

Addressing your Elderly Parents in your Estate Plan in 5 Steps

Typically, an estate plan includes accommodations for your spouse, children, grandchildren and even future generations. But some members of the family can be overlooked, such as your parents or in-laws. Yet the older generation may also need your financial assistance. How can you best handle the financial affairs of parents…

Take care of a loved one who has special needs with a special needs trust

When creating or revising your estate plan, it’s important to take into account all of your loved ones. Because each family has its own unique set of circumstances, there are a variety of trusts and other vehicles available to specifically address most families’ estate planning objectives. Special needs trusts (SNTs),…

Yes, Your College-Age Child Needs an Estate Plan

Even though college students typically don’t have many assets, it’s still critical for them to consider having a basic estate plan in the event the unexpected happens.  Consider meeting with an estate planning attorney to discuss putting in place at least these four documents if an unforeseen incident occurs while…

Is your Estate Plan up to date Following a Divorce?

If you’ve recently divorced, your time likely has been consumed with attorney meetings and negotiations, even if everything was amicable. Probably the last thing you want to do is review your estate plan. But you owe it to yourself and your children to make the necessary updates to reflect your…

In your own words: A letter of instruction complements a will

A smart estate plan should leave no doubt as to your intentions. Writing a letter of instruction can go a long way toward clearly communicating all of your thoughts and wishes. Even though the letter, unlike a valid will, isn’t legally binding, it can be valuable to your surviving family…

Have you named contingent beneficiaries?

Although your will or revocable trust governs the distribution of many or most of your assets, certain assets — such as retirement plans, insurance policies, and bank or brokerage accounts — require you to name a beneficiary (or beneficiaries). This can be an advantage, because when you die, the funds…

Estate planning for the young and affluent can be tricky

Events of the last decade have taught us that tax law is anything but certain. So how can young, affluent people plan their estates when the tax landscape may look dramatically different 20, 30 or 40 years from now — or even a few months from now? The answer is…

Review your estate plan in light of a new presidential administration

As President-elect Joe Biden moves forward with the transition and prepares for the inauguration next month, you may be wondering how the federal estate tax may be affected. During the campaign, Biden pledged to roll back many of President Trump’s tax policies. In response to the Tax Cuts and Jobs…

Put pen to paper: How a letter of instruction can benefit family harmony

You may view your will as the centerpiece of your estate plan. But other documents can complement it. For example, if you haven’t already done so, consider writing a letter of instruction. Elements of the letter A letter of instruction is an informal document providing your loved ones with vital…